#158: Wellness Workshop Ideas You Can Use with Kristen Ciccolini

Whether in-person or online, workshops are a killer way to earn income, find clients and build confidence. And the best part – you don’t need a mailing list to be successful with these! Join Michelle and Kristen for a free event – 5 Ways To Boost Income with Wellness Workshops on 8/18/21: http://healthcoachpower.com/wellnessworkshops

Subscribe to these episodes on YouTube, or:
iTunes – https://apple.co/2sOjwVA
Stitcher – http://bit.ly/2K3UaN6
Google Play – http://bit.ly/2Jx9x0Y
Spotify – https://spoti.fi/2Y0Eu1r

Michelle Leotta:
Hello, health coaches. I'm Michelle Leotta. I am a certified practicing health coach. I'm a mentor for you, my fellow health coaches. And today I'm joined by Kristen Ciccolini, who is a health coach in the Boston area to give you ideas for wellness workshops that you can run with, even if you're brand new coach, right? Even if you're still in school, I want you to listen to this episode, even if you're like, I don't even have a mailing list yet. I rarely say this, but this is something you can do even without a mailing list. So don't let that hold you back. It does not matter. Workshops are an insanely accessible way to market yourself, whether you're doing things in person or you're online. So listen, sometimes as a health coach, we're going to do workshops that are unpaid, that's normal. I've done them. I think most of us have done those.

Michelle Leotta:
Sometimes we get paid for the workshop. That's really cool. So like, let's say there's 10 people and each pay 20 bucks. That's a whopping $200. But the question is right. How can you really, really get paid and like use workshops as an income stream because they can be so Kristen and I are holding a free event to teach exactly that. Like, the money side of workshops like it. Yeah. And it's coming up next week, August 18th. I want you to go register for that now. It's free. There's no reason why not go register yourself. If that healthcoachpower.com/wellnessworkshops. And I'm going to drop that link over here in the comments for those of you that are with us on Facebook as we record today. But anyway, for now, Kristen, thanks for joining me today.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Thanks for having me. I'm glad to be back.

Michelle Leotta:
Yeah. You've been on the show before you guys should all search the archives for other shows that Kristen has been on. But one of the reasons for that is because Kristen, you were part of healthy profit university's fast track program a couple of years ago, maybe two, three years ago.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Yeah. 2019, I think.

Michelle Leotta:
Yeah. Something like that. Yeah. So by the way, the wait list for the falls fast track semester is going to be available next week. If any of y'all been thinking about it just wanted to let you know that was coming up. But anyway, that's why I know Kristen so well, and I know a lot about your business already, but you have to tell everybody else just a little bit, like how long have you been a health coach and tell us a little bit about your workshop experience. Like how many workshops have you done?

Kristen Ciccolini:
Well, I, I believe I've lost count by now. But, I've been a health coach for almost five years now. So I got my nutrition certification, from the academy of culinary nutrition in 2016. So I did not go to I N M I know that's like there's everyone goes to IIN, but there are different options, right?

Michelle Leotta:
Oh, there definitely are. We got coaches from all different schools. Yeah.

Kristen Ciccolini:
So that's where I did mine. And then I started my business in January 2017. Um, and then six months later, I quit my job and went out on my own. So it's been about four and a half years that I've been doing this. In terms of how many workshops I've done. Yeah, definitely. I've lost count by now. I started off doing cooking classes for my local community center, which turned into workshops for the community center. And that turned into offering bigger cooking classes to an adult education center here in Boston. And that also turned into more nutrition workshops. So, you know, it was a lot of, um, you know, starting small and slowly, slowly getting bigger and all in between all that. I've done corporate workshops for nonprofits for small businesses for global businesses. So I've done quite a bit over the years.

Michelle Leotta:
Heck yeah. And we're going to talk a little bit more about venues, but I wanted you guys to just hear what Kristen just said about, she was doing things both for corporate settings, but also just like local in the community. I mean, I know that community organization that you're talking about, Kristen, I used to take belly dance classes there back in the day, you know, but every, I think every area has one of those community organizations that have classes on everything from belly dancing to nutrition, to, you know, whatever coding for computers and things like that. So this is an idea for you guys, if you think, like, I don't know where to hold a workshop. Okay. So we're talking about workshops today. And one thing that we have noticed over the past couple of weeks is a lot of people are like, well, what is a workshop exactly?

Michelle Leotta:
Is it... Does it count as a workshop if I'm doing it on zoom? Is it a workshop if I'm holding like a five day challenge or, you know, what about, like, if I'm standing at a speech and I'm giving a, I'm sending a podium and I'm giving a speech and maybe I have like a PowerPoint going behind me, like, it's funny because a workshop can be, it can take on many different forums. So I'm just going to toss this one to you, Kristen. How do you, how do you define a workshop? Where does that definition kind of begin and end?

Kristen Ciccolini:
Yeah. There's a lot of confusion around it. I feel like the words like workshop talk webinar, like all of that kind of got morphed into the same thing. And I feel like there used to be more of a difference between talk and workshop. Like talk is just like me standing in front of you teaching a class and you listening. And a workshop was considered to be more interactive, like breakout rooms, activities to do. Um, but now I find people are using workshop to reference just any type of class. Um, and you know, with our workshops, we do want to make it interactive. It doesn't necessarily mean you have to have people doing like all these little separate activities, but we want engagement in there. So the only difference I see more is between a workshop in a webinar where workshop is just teaching and providing value in education.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Like you said, it can take so many different forms and a webinar is something where education, you know, there's, you provide value through education, but with the main goal to sell something at the end. So workshop is just education for education's sake. Whereas webinar is for the selling point at the end. So a workshop can be teaching a class, doing a cooking demo, um, doing a hands-on cooking class. It can be a lecture. It can be like an interactive sharing circle. You know, you can be more descriptive with it if you want to, if you want to say more than just workshop, but workshop, I think tends to cover all of those bases. Now, does that sound right to you?

Michelle Leotta:
Yeah, I mean, those are kind of the big differentiators, you know, a lot of times we're signing up for a webinar or something and there's like a big sale, you know, a sales element to it. And that that's fine. The workshops that we're really talking about today are the ones where a corporation might pay you $500 to show up, be there for an hour, do a lunch and learn kind of thing with their employees. And you're out of there. You got paid, done and done. Now of course you can build on that. You can make that into more and more than just that single $500, but we're going to talk about that. The other question or concern that I see coming up a lot in the community is this worry that nobody's going to show up or, you know, I have had seen a lot of coaches say I planned this workshop, I put my heart and soul into it and then like one person showed up. So that's like, everybody's most cringe-worthy fear. I have some ideas around this, but I'm curious, like, what has your experience been? Have you ever had the no shows?

Kristen Ciccolini:
Oh yeah, totally. I find it happens more often with free workshops because there's no investment there. I also have found like over the last year, everything has moved online as you know, and people are kind of inundated. So where, where they'll sign up for workshops, even if they pay for it, they might not even show up live. And that's okay. You know, a lot of people just want the convenience of the recording to watch when they want to watch it afterwards and not necessarily attend live. So people don't show up live. That doesn't necessarily mean it's a bad thing. It does feel, it can feel like why am I doing? But I think especially there's a couple of different perks. You know, if it's a small group, when you're in person, it can be more intimate and people get to know you a little bit better, and that can be better for, um, turning them into paying clients versus like speaking to a room where you can't really give people as much attention over those tons of people. And then if it's online and only a couple of people show up, same kind of thing, you can give them some more, um, personalized attention, but also you can record it. You can send it out, you can repurpose it. You can do more with it than just that, you know, one and done kind of thing.

Michelle Leotta:
True, true. I think it normally happens. The no shows happen. You're right when it's free and where I think it's when we try to host our own workshop, you know, we reserve that room at the library where the natural food store and all the marketing is on us to get people there. Um, not that that can't be done. It can, but I feel like it works better when you are doing a workshop for an organization or for a business where they routinely offer this kind of thing and their employees, or their clientele are used to going there for workshops. It's like a normal thing. Like I always have really good luck at yoga studios because, you know, for any of you that are yogis and that's probably at least half of us, right. Yoga studios always have workshops on different topics, right? Like yoga topics, nutrition, topics, whatever. So people know how that goes. It's like a standard routine, oh, they're offering a workshop. It's 20 bucks. It's 30 bucks, whatever. Um, versus, you know, no, very few people routinely go to the library for some free seminar. That, that was kind of my main thought. Like those two things you want it to be paid, which again, happens at a place like a yoga studio and you want it to be an audience that is primed for attending. Am I missing any other venues that tend to work well?

Kristen Ciccolini:
You know, well, yoga studios, wellness centers... I mentioned the community center, not all community centers are geared towards adults. You know, when you think community center it's like elderly, children, but some, some places are looking for more adult things. If that's a place you want to get started, um, you know, conferences, retreats, corporate stuff.

Michelle Leotta:
Yeah, talk about a captive audience. People are already paying to be on a retreat and you're going to do a workshop as part of that retreat. Like they're going to show up.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Yeah, exactly. Um, I know Julie has done stuff at schools. I think she, I thought I saw her mentioned that the other day. I've done stuff at health stores where they actually run events. So it's not just me being like, Hey, let's try this new thing. No, they actually run events and people show up to them. So it is good to do your research there and see, you know, if they do have regular events.

Michelle Leotta:
Yeah, places with a track record.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Yeah, exactly.

Michelle Leotta:
Okay, cool. So before we start dishing and all the different, like workshops that we've done, I want to talk about topics. I want to talk about structure. What if you're more of an introvert? You're a shy person. I know a lot of coaches are like, Hey, yo, I like nutrition. I like cooking. I like talking to people one-on-one but I am not interested in standing up in front of a crowd if you're not like a public speaking kind of person. Like, I know that you've had to overcome a bit of that. So I was hoping you could share like what that process is like.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Yeah, yeah. I am definitely an introvert introvert. I hide from people all the time. If I see you in public and I don't feel like being social, I will hide. So, if I can do it, it's a for you to, it's more just like, you know, being in the zone, but the more you get to do it in the more you get practice, the more you'll learn about yourself and understand yourself and the things that you like and dislike the things that, um, you need to make you feel supported and prepared. Like for me, I tend to need like extremely detailed notes or I get nervous that I'll just stumble over my words and forget everything that I've ever learned. So I know to support myself with a script or really detailed bullets, but, um, you know, you don't know what you need unless you actually try it.

Kristen Ciccolini:
So, my very, very first class was while I was still in school, I did it for my family. They all sat around the kitchen table and I talked about the food that we were eating and why it was healthy, the different ingredients. And I recorded it on my phone so I could watch and see what I needed to work on. So you could start that small if you wanted to and just get some practice. But the point is to practice because that's the only way you're going to get over it. There's no like magic pill. There's no, there's no like hack that you can do. It's really just practicing and getting used to it because I mean, I've done a lot virtually and I find that that helps get over the fear a little bit. So maybe when you're in person, it's a little bit easier. Um, so it depends on your nature, but I know for me being an introvert, that's, what's been helpful, but um, you know, getting over that fear, finally getting moving, like that's what you need to do because fear can hold you back so much in business.

Michelle Leotta:
Uh, yeah. In like all ways. And it's almost like if you can get up in front of a group and speak for even 20 minutes, if you can do that, you're going to feel like, oh, I can do anything. You know, that's one of the scariest things, right? I think public speaking is like a big fear for most people. Clara saying that was a great idea to workshop with the family. They can be the best critics I was thinking, oh my God, like right now, if I have to hold the workshop for my family, I would be stumbling over my words and feeling like an idiot, but I could stand in front of 300 strangers, no problem. But yours must have been very happy and willing to sit around the table for you.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Well, I was feeding them, so yeah.

Michelle Leotta:
That's good. That's a good tip. Eating some good food. Oh, what a cool idea. Yeah. Or just a group of girlfriends, right? Like again, literally strangers will be easier later, but start with people, you know, that's a great way to, to not worry about flubbing up in the middle of it cause they won't care.

Michelle Leotta:
Awesome. So if you guys have any other objections in your head, like I could never do a workshop because, and you're here live, go ahead and put that in the comments. So maybe we can address some of those as we move along. Like I tried to hit on the big ones, Jill saying I prepared a workshop and have yet to give it, but I did ask a few friends to watch and give me feedback on slides, presentation skills and things I left out. Okay, cool. Oh, you guys, lots of comments today.

Michelle Leotta:
Chrissy says, I recently read that fear of public speaking goes back to caveman days. It's an age old problem. It must be, you know, like if I'm standing by myself in front of everybody, I'm, I'm a target. Maybe, you know, you're just like an easy target for ridicule or for, I don't know, a bow and arrow or something back in caveman days, a rock. So there must be something to wanting to like kind of cower with the crowd, but this is not how you elevate yourself into the status of a professional, an expert, you know, how do you start being seen as an expert, put yourself on a stage, even a virtual stage. And suddenly everybody just assumes that, you know what you're talking about and you do. But you know, they, they, all of a sudden they think it too. Okay. So let's talk about different types of workshops that we can give.

Michelle Leotta:
Um, and before we even talk about topics, I was just considering all the different structures that are like the format that a workshop can take. So like we started to talk about doing things in a yoga studio. And my experience with that is you're sitting on the floor, you know, criss cross applesauce, as we say these days in a circle of like 10 people, you know, maybe 12 or 15, like that's it. And you really like are going to know everybody's name and you're going to be able to talk directly to them. There can be a lot of hands-on activities like passing things around or, you know, pairing people up. It can be very, very interactive that way. Um, I used to do something called the sugar smack down and I did that all over the place, but that was my favorite format for that event because I had a lot of hands-on stuff for people. What about like big crowds? What sort of like large scale workshops have you done Kristen?

Kristen Ciccolini:
Well, large... When it's larger, it's more of like the lecture style. Um, just because it's harder to do the interaction stuff, but I mean that way in those types of settings, that's where I really do prefer like the slides and my script. So I'm on point and not focusing on all of the people that are in front of me. Um, but you know, both like, like we were talking about earlier, both can have their different perks, like a large setting you get in front of more people and you start getting comfortable in front of more people. So yeah, you can also, I mean, you can get clients out of that too. So there's different perks for different settings. And I like what you said about, um, like the activities, like passing things around. One thing that I used to do even, I actually did this for a group of a hundred.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Maybe it might've been a little too big for this, but I passed around chocolates and I had, um, I definitely purchased a lot of chocolate for that event, but it was more of like a mindful eating practice where, um, we just ate the chocolate in three bites and some people like ate the chocolate as soon as I gave it to them and didn't even wait for the practice. But it was, it was a fun thing to do. I mean, I mean, it can be for a larger crowd too, but things like that, even small things where you're bringing sort of like a physical experience to it that can be done big or small as long as you prepare ahead for it. But, um, yeah, there's, there's different ways that you can do things. And I also know, I think you have done in the past too, like a multi-day or multi-part workshop, right?

Michelle Leotta:
Yeah. You can do like a part, one part two where you do one on Saturday, one on Sunday and people can sign up for both or they can sign up for adjust one. That's a nice way to expand the income, right? Because it's like, you just held it as one workshop. How much can you really charge? But if you kind of beef it up a little bit and now it's two separate workshops or they can be bundled together, you know, you probably make twice as much money. So that's another structure to consider. If you have a bigger topic that also works well, if you're going to be traveling, you know, like who's going to travel a significant distance, like stay overnight somewhere to give a one hour workshop. Like that might be a tall order. But if you can have like a multi-day workshop at that venue, now, maybe it's worth your time. So that's something to consider. Um, and then of course, like in the online space, all of this can happen in the online space. The multi-day workshop can be online. You know, the small group, very hands-on stuff can be online or you could be presenting to like 10,000 employees all online at the same time. So I guess why I want to talk about this is because everyone has a picture in their head of what like a workshop should look like, but there are like endless possibilities for how to structure it.

Michelle Leotta:
Let me see what Jill is saying over here. She says, I have this fear that people will ask challenging science-based questions and I won't have the answers to. Yes, that's a great one. Thank you, Jill. She said how to deal with that. So, Kristen let's say that I challenge you on something in your workshop. Hey, I read on the internet that what you just said is actually wrong because the science, blah, blah, blah, what would you say to me?

Kristen Ciccolini:
Well, first I would say that that really doesn't happen that often. So I wouldn't get too afraid of that. You are the expert, so the questions that you get are definitely going to be within your scope, for the most part, when you do get questions like that, it's okay to say you don't know. It really is. I know we're afraid because we're supposed to be the expert, but it's really okay. They, I mean, people trust you more when you admit you don't know something. So, when I get a question like that, what I would normally say is like, you know what, that's really interesting. I can't give you, uh, a perfect answer off the top of my head right now. That's something I'll have to look into. I can get back to you on that. Or I can, if you want to follow up with me after class, we can talk about it.

Kristen Ciccolini:
So that way, you know, you aren't stumbling throughout your, your workshop, you know, being nervous after that, or, um, you know, you weren't derailed because sometimes, I mean, really not often people can kind of ask you more and more of those questions. Well, I heard this and I heard that and you don't want to derail your conversation. So, it's like, you know what, we'll talk about this after the workshop, if you want to follow up with me and it's completely okay to do that, I know we're so afraid to do that, but it's okay to say you don't know. Yes.

Michelle Leotta:
I mean, I think it's the responsible thing to do.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Yeah, exactly.

Michelle Leotta:
Even if somebody is a... It doesn't really happen that much, but we're all afraid somebody's going to come to us with that sort of attitude, or I know more than you kind of thing. And I mean, we all know, that's just, it's more about them than it is about you. And if you can keep it in perspective and say like, I'd love to talk to you more about that, you know, follow up with me. Chances are you can actually get in a really good conversation with them. You know? Like they they're coming across confrontational maybe, but, um, there probably there's some fear there's something going on within them. And then they might actually become a really good client. So, um, yeah. Sometimes questions come up in like a really light-hearted like, good-hearted way, sometimes not so much, but I find for the most part, yeah, people are very respectful of, you know, you're the person on the stage and they're not trying to rock the boat too much. Yeah.

Kristen Ciccolini:
It almost never happens. I wouldn't worry about it.

Michelle Leotta:
Okay, good. That's a really good assurance for everybody. Um, and Allie saying that one of her jobs required her to give 15 minute presentations every week to new employees. And she legit had panic attacks every single week, but after a while, they started to become her favorite part of the job. So, you never know until you try. Yeah. Like isn't there, that's a thing, like the thing that you don't want to do the most, like, that's the next thing that you have to do. That's how you grow. Everyone's like, oh crap.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Well, that's how you get comfortable with it. And I mean, when you first started those workshops, you probably, you know, didn't know the information as well, or you weren't, you know, didn't feel confident about it, but the more you do it, the more you're like, yeah, I could do this with my eyes closed or, you know.

Michelle Leotta:
Totally, totally. That's cool. Thank you for sharing that Allie. So let's share some of the different workshop topics that we've done. Um, I already shared that I have done one, many times called the sugar smack down. That was a riff on the sugar blues talk that IIN used to give out. I don't know if they still do, but I find that a sugar topic is timeless. You know, you can hold that for so many different groups of people and it still works. So that always did really well for me. Another classic one... Again, cause we do have a lot of IIN people. Um, but if you, I don't, again, I don't know if they still do this, but they used to come out an outline for an workshop called Weigh Less Live More. I think that's what it was called, Weigh Less Live More so I've given that.

Michelle Leotta:
And then I came up with several on my own through the years, you know, I did one for the holidays, like healthy through the holidays. One of my first ones was at yoga studios and I called it the yoga of food, which I thought was just like so fascinating, but like really that was not a title to draw people in. That was just like something I was personally interested in, which is something to be aware of. What do, what does our audience want? What did they want to learn about what problems do they want to solve? Anyway, what about you, Kristen? What are your, some of your favorite topics that you've done?

Kristen Ciccolini:
I definitely have the sugar ones, 10 ways to kick the sugar habit. Definitely had healthy through the holidays that specific time, because these are, these are really common things that people want to know. I had an energy boosting class, um, meal planning to save time and money, wellness while traveling. you know, it's all the things you think about all of the things that you get asked about. It's a lot of this stuff. So I mean, those are pretty common concerns that people have. So we want to be able to have a workshop that attracts these people. And this also, if you have a particular niche, you can tailor these common workshops to your niche too. So, um, yeah, those are the main things that I've done and they've done really well.

Michelle Leotta:
They've all done. Well, you even had one. I remember last year when we were talking about the workshop you put together specifically about health during quarantine.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Yeah. Last year, I mean literally like within a week of the shutdown here, I offered self-care in self-quarantine and it was all about, you know, how to take care of yourself and your community, your immune health. Um, and I literally, I offered that the first time, March 17th. So that's how quick I did it.

Michelle Leotta:
Boom.

Kristen Ciccolini:
But then I realized that I couldn't continue to offer that to my community. So I started offering it more to the corporate setting and like, that was really how I helped my business stay in business throughout last year. So yeah. So, topical things work as well and that you can turn or that it could turn into just a basic immune health class after the pandemic is over. So, classes are adaptable,

Michelle Leotta:
Smart. Smart, smart things. I hope you're all taking notes. And the other thing that I want you all to think about when you're considering running a workshop and honestly like before you do any kind of marketing activity in your business is to go into it with the thought, like, what is the business goal here? What am I trying to achieve? You know, so for example, if you're trying to fill your practice with, you know, corporate men who have diabetes and someone asks you to do a workshop at the daycare for all of the, you know, moms, when they pick up their kids about like packing lunches, you're going to go wait a minute. That's not what I'm trying to achieve in my business. You know? So it's like a really good litmus test for like, is this the right opportunity for me? And then when you're going into that workshop, you know, which you now have set up with the corporate men who have diabetes, or, you know, maybe in their place of work, you're going to go do the workshop for their lunch and learn or something like that.

Michelle Leotta:
Again, what I want to get out of this, am I trying to build my mailing list? Is that the most important thing? Because it's, so there are ways to structure your workshops. So you get every single person's name on your mailing list, you know, am I more concerned like Kristen was during quarantine more concerned with, I need to earn money. I need to keep my business afloat right now. If that's the case, maybe you're going to go in again, not just with one workshop, but with like a series of three that the company has to buy. So you're really going in with the dollar signs in mind. Um, I think there's lots of different ways to approach. And I'm curious as your business has grown through the years, Kristen, like, what do you think your main goal was in the beginning? And what is it now?

Kristen Ciccolini:
I think my main goal in the beginning was to build confidence. Um, so, you know, as I talked about, I'm an introvert. I needed confidence speaking in front of people. So that's why starting small with those community center classes was really helpful. Um, then my goal became to build the mailing list. So once I started to have some confidence, I also wanted to grow my list. So I had people to sell to. Um, so I would do a lot of free classes, but in exchange for emails or if I did them in person, I would offer something where they had to give me their email. So if I did like an energy workshop, I would offer an energy meal plan if they gave me their email address after class or something like that. Um, and then earn income, obviously that's like the main goal all around, but you have to put things in place first before that can be your main source of income.

Michelle Leotta:
Nice. And, and now this really is like one of your major income streams, correct?

Kristen Ciccolini:
Yeah, yeah, absolutely. And I think it's good that you talk about, you know, figuring out what your goal is first, because I think when you are doing that thing where you're throwing spaghetti at the wall to see or throwing everything at the wall to see what sticks is, you're going to get a lot of opportunities that just don't make sense. And it can be good in the beginning if you are trying to just build confidence and trying to get some practice. But when it comes to, like you're saying, if like going to the complete wrong audience, it's just kind of a waste of your time, especially if it's not paying or, you know, it's just not going to be, it's not going to have a good return on your time investment there. So it's good to think about the goals.

Michelle Leotta:
Claire saying great tip to keep the goal in mind. Jill said for quick turnaround classes, do you use slides or just talk without pictures or visuals? Do you ever do without?

Kristen Ciccolini:
Quick turnaround classes, like something I need to do soon?

Michelle Leotta:
Yeah, I'm assuming like she has an opportunity tomorrow. Is it okay to just go in without a slideshow? Yeah.

Kristen Ciccolini:
I mean, it depends on, you know, the type of audience that you're speaking to. I think it can be totally fine cause I always have my notes like up on the screen. So I would just make sure I have detailed bulleted notes. You definitely don't always have to have slides. Some people like them, some people don't. I tend to like them, but if I were doing something super last minute, I would just do a Google doc of notes and keep that up on my screen.

Michelle Leotta:
You could totally do that. You could also have visuals in another sentence, you know, like maybe it's, you know, I do a lot of label reading and workshops that I've done. So that means I'm going to the store and buying a bunch of products, you know? And everyone's going to be looking at the products in their hand. In that case, maybe you don't even need a slideshow or any visuals or any screen at all. Right? Because some venues don't even have a screen. But I would say typically, especially these days when everything is online, if you're just going to be a talking head on the screen for an hour, that can become a bit much. So it's nice to break it up. Even if you're just sharing your screen, like, you know, to your... I don't know. It depends what you're doing, you know, a workshop on, but to not just be a talking head for an hour can be really helpful.

Michelle Leotta:
Of course, I'm saying that hilariously, as we had been talking heads on this screen now for the duration of this episode, but see? You were listening and you were here, so maybe it's not so bad. Here's what I want you all to do. If you haven't already, I want you to skedaddle over to your closest, handy internet device and register for our upcoming event called five ways to boost income with wellness workshops where Kristen and I are going to be helping you use these ideas to add to your bottom line. Like Kristen said, that's the main goal overall of running a business. So we want to help you get there. Plus we're going to show you how to plan and create your own workshop and talk a little bit about your topic ideas you can register for free to join us at healthcoachpower.com/wellnessworkshops. And we will see you all there. Thanks for being here today, Kristen.

Kristen Ciccolini:
Thanks for having me.

Michelle Leotta:
See you later. Bye.